December242013

video

(Source: thinkofmewhenuforgetyourseatbelt)

Reblogged from Old tin cups, little paper dolls.

October242013

link

coal terminal action group »

The Coal Terminal Action Group (CTAG) is an alliance of Newcastle and Hunter community groups formed in response to the proposal to build a fourth coal terminal in Newcastle, Australia. 

The proponent is Port Waratah Coal Services. The new coal terminal (T4) would have capacity for 120 million tonnes per year of coal if approved, potentially doubling Newcastle coal exports.  The coal stockpiles would not be covered, resulting in more dust pollution blowing onto Stockton and Mayfield West. The new coal terminal would result in more than 100 additional uncovered coal trains travelling through Newcastle every day, if approved. This would mean more coal dust and diesel pollution in suburbs along the coal rail line.

The new coal terminal would result in at least 20 more ships entering Newcastle Harbour, every week, if approved. Producing the coal for the terminal would require approximately 15 new large open-cut coal mines in the Hunter Valley and Gunnedah Basin. This would mean destruction of forests and agricultural land, and polluted water. The new coal terminal would be developed on 279 hectares of land on Kooragang Island and Ash Island, if approved. This would destroy internationally significant wetlands and bird habitat.

To proceed, the project needs approved from both the NSW and Federal Governments. Let’s make sure that doesn’t happen.

Tags: /climate /coal /community /activism

October212013

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"“There was a time when I believed that the basic quality that an organizer needed was a deep sense of anger against injustice and that this was the prime motivation that kept him going. I now know that it is something else: this abnormal imagination that sweeps him into a close identification with mankind and projects him into its plight. He suffers with them and becomes angry at the injustice and begins to organize the rebellion. Clarence Darrow put it on more of a self-interest basis: “I had a vivid imagination. Not only could I put myself in the other person’s place, but I could not avoid doing so. My sympathies always went out to the weak, the suffering, and the poor. Realizing their sorrows I tried to relieve them in order that I myself might be relieved.”"

— Saul Alinsky (Rules for Radicals)

(Source: theyearofselfeducation)

Reblogged from Wanderings.

October202013

link

secret republic: The Real Reason Why Bicycles are the Key to Better Cities »

thegreenurbanist:

secretrepublic:

We all know the talking points. The benefits of bicycles have been tirelessly elaborated upon; bicycles improve health, ease congestion, save money, use less space, and provide efficient transportation with zero fuel consumption and zero carbon emissions. All of this is great, and the culmination…

Regular reblog; revisited this today. 

Reblogged from The Green Urbanist..

October192013

link

A Decade after the Take: Inside Argentina's Worker Owned Factories »

Tags: /cooperatives /new economy /resilience

October182013

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unconsumption:


In the rush to help create low carbon economies as a solution to curbing climate change, the construction industry has strived to create zero-carbon homes whose footprint is negligible. Now UK company Lignacite has developed the Carbon Buster, a building block that is actually carbon negative.
Made from over 50 percent recycled material, the brick is an amalgam of cement, sand and water. It also features wood particles that sequester carbon dioxide and store the gas in the block itself, rather than emitting it into the atmosphere. According to test results, its 3.6N/mm2 strength bricks have an embodied carbon level of -14 kg per tonne – compared to the industry standard of 100kg. Its 7.3N/mm2 strength model also has -3 kg per tonne rating. According to the company, the blocks are suitable for most building projects and also offer greater noise absorption than industry standards.

 Building block captures more CO2 than it creates | Springwise

unconsumption:

In the rush to help create low carbon economies as a solution to curbing climate change, the construction industry has strived to create zero-carbon homes whose footprint is negligible. Now UK company Lignacite has developed the Carbon Buster, a building block that is actually carbon negative.

Made from over 50 percent recycled material, the brick is an amalgam of cement, sand and water. It also features wood particles that sequester carbon dioxide and store the gas in the block itself, rather than emitting it into the atmosphere. According to test results, its 3.6N/mm2 strength bricks have an embodied carbon level of -14 kg per tonne – compared to the industry standard of 100kg. Its 7.3N/mm2 strength model also has -3 kg per tonne rating. According to the company, the blocks are suitable for most building projects and also offer greater noise absorption than industry standards.

 Building block captures more CO2 than it creates | Springwise

Reblogged from Unconsumption.

October172013

video

architizer:

How To Turn Your City Into A Lab: Designing The Innovation Economy

Reblogged from Architizer.

October162013

photo

utnereader:

10 Steps to Building a Truly Sustainable Community
An ecovillage is an intentional community committed to becoming more sustainable. In practice, this means that the resource inputs for the necessities of living come from local sources and are by and large derived directly from nature in a way that allows nature to perpetually replenish itself and continually supply the needed materials. Ecovillages are also designed using whole systems design principles, to maximize overall quality of life for humans.
Here’s a 10-step guide to help you get started making the shift.

utnereader:

10 Steps to Building a Truly Sustainable Community

An ecovillage is an intentional community committed to becoming more sustainable. In practice, this means that the resource inputs for the necessities of living come from local sources and are by and large derived directly from nature in a way that allows nature to perpetually replenish itself and continually supply the needed materials. Ecovillages are also designed using whole systems design principles, to maximize overall quality of life for humans.

Here’s a 10-step guide to help you get started making the shift.

Reblogged from Utne Reader.

October152013

link

The Future Is Not What it Used to Be: Climate Change and Energy Scarcity, by Jörg Friedrichs »

Friedrichs considers how we might respond to energy scarcity. Using an approach that is new, to me at any rate, he analyses what happened when there were disruptive shortages of energy in modern societies. In a sober, and sobering, chapter, he relates what ensued: “predatory militarism” in Japan in the 1920s and 1930s, and totalitarian lockdown to preserve elite privileges while millions starved in North Korea in the 1990s. The only hopeful case is Cuba in the 1990s, when an unusually cohesive society managed to reconfigure production to feed everyone. None of these is a particularly good model for a global system facing declining oil production, however. It would most likely lead, Friedrichs suggests, not to immediate collapse or any smooth transition, but to painful adaptation that could last a century or more.

Tags: /transition /energy

October142013

link

Baltimore Food and Farm Festival at Real Food Farm | Baltimore Gardener »

Baltimore’s Real Food Farm, an urban farm located in Clifton Park for the 3rd Annual Urban Farm and Food Fair put on by the Farm Alliance of Baltimore City.